Here’s part 3 of our series on ineffective ways to ask for referrals. You can also view the previous parts: part 1,   part 2.

image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dannyboyster/60371673/

Share

Here’s part 2 of our multi-part series on ineffective ways to ask for referrals. To see part 1, click here.

Share

As we’ve said repeatedly, referral marketing is the best way to gain new clients or customers, and if you want more referrals, you have to ask.  Unfortunately, some of the ways people commonly ask just aren’t that effective. In this video (#1 in a multi-part series), we show you how NOT to ask.

Share

You provide great products or services. Your clients or customers love you. Surely they’ll spread the word. Think again…

Do you ever wonder why more new clients or customers aren’t beating a path to your door?

When it comes to referral marketing, many professionals and companies take a passive approach. They assume that the business will grow organically—that referrals will be a natural result of providing good services or products. We call this “the organic approach.”

Sure, you may experience some organic growth due to word of mouth. But that growth will be limited. There are two BIG PROBLEMS with the organic approach:

Continue reading »

Share
 

Lead Generation: Cold Calling – Do You Have a Choice?

On December 9, 2010, in Uncategorized, by Phil Glosserman

Most people hate cold calling. That goes for the people making the calls and those receiving them. When it comes to lead generation, is cold calling absolutely necessary? (This is the second part of our video series on cold calling. You can see part 1 here.)

Share
 

In planning your lead generation activities, it’s essential to know your odds. How does cold calling stack up against warm lead generation? (This is the first part of our video series on cold calling. You can see part 2 here.)

Share
 

Most referral marketing advice we’ve seen focuses on activities that build your personal brand and your connections—for example: writing newsletters, lunches, golf dates, handing out business cards, sending out articles or handwritten notes, etc.

We call these kinds of activities professional presencing, because they are designed to establish your presence in the minds of other professionals who might be able to refer you business someday.

Professional presencing is a good thing. We encourage you to do it, BUT…

Professional presencing is no substitute for asking for referrals.

How come?

Continue reading »

Share
Tagged with:  

Most referral marketing advice we’ve seen focuses on activities that build your personal brand and your connections—for example: writing newsletters, lunches, golf dates, sending out articles or handwritten notes, etc.  Do these activities REALLY lead to referrals?

Share
 

Referral Marketing – Why do People Refer You?

On December 1, 2010, in referral marketing, by Phil Glosserman

Why do you suppose someone would be motivated to refer you?

Would it be to help you? Possibly. But that’s not all there is to it.

Normally, people are motivated to do something because they get something out of it. So what do people get out of referring you? Why would they do it?

People get 3 things out of making referrals.

Continue reading »

Share